Category Archives: Four Star Rating

‘The Tenth Circle’ by Jodi Picoult (May Contain Spoilers)

the-tenth-circle

Description:

Trixie Stone only goes to the party that night to get her boyfriend back.

By morning, Trixie is under police protection and Jason, her ex, has been arrested on suspicion of date rape.

There are no witnesses. The physical evidence is inconclusive. It is her word against his.

Who is telling the truth?

My Thoughts:

I’m one of those people who, when a friend recommends a novel, I’ll give it go, despite whether the books’ genre isn’t something I would usually read. In this way, I’ve discovered some fantastic novels.

I had never read anything from Jodi Picoult until ‘The Tenth Circle’ was recommended to me but overall, I thought it was a good read. However there were some elements that I feel could have been better.

Firstly, the positives. I liked the fact that a sensitive issue such as rape, wasn’t just focused on through a female’s perspective, but how a father would feel, if their daughter were a rape victim. I could identify with the characters and thought that they were believable. I cared about them enough to find out what was going to happen to them.I also thought that the interweaving of the comic book the male character is working on, as a metaphor for the events and feelings the characters were experiencing throughout the book, was an interesting concept, particularly being a Marvel fan myself.

The main problem for me though, was towards the end. Whilst at the beginning of this novel I thought that this was going to be about how each member of the Stone family dealt with Trixie’s rape, it kind of unravelled into being something that you would see in a cheesy tv movie. The journey in which the characters were taken on, seemed over sentimental and just a bit too convenient, rather than dealt with the real issues at hand. It felt like Jodi Picoult had given up trying to finish the story and gave us a half hearted one, rather than a strong and gutsy ending that I think this story deserved.

All in all, I wouldn’t say that I hated this novel. I will probably read more Jodi Picoult novels in future, but I hope that any future novels I decide to read have better endngs than this book.

 

Rating: ****

 

REVIEW-‘The Truth’ by Terry Pratchett

 

the truth

 

What the ‘blurb’ says:

William de Worde is the accidental editor of the Discworld’s first newspaper. New printing technology means that words just won’t obediently stay nailed down like usual. There’s a very real threat of news getting out there.

Now he must cope with the traditional perils of a journalist’s life – people who want him dead, a recovering vampire with a suicidal fascination for flash photography, some more people who want him dead in a different way and, worst of all, the man who keeps begging him to publish pictures of his humorously shaped potatoes.

William just wants to get at THE TRUTH. Unfortunately, everyone else wants to get at William. And it’s only the third edition…

My thoughts:

Before reading this novel I had only read one of the ‘Discworld’ novels, so wasn’t entirely sure whether 1. I was going to enjoy this 2. Having jumped out of the sequence of ‘Discworld’ novels (‘The Truth’ is 25th in the series), whether I was going to understand anything.

I was pleased to find that this novel can be read as a stand-alone book and I really enjoyed it.

The world where these books are based is concise and well rounded,  and the characters are believable; considering the fact that there are vampires, wolves and talking chairs in this! The plot was engaging, although did get a little too silly towards the end.

The main attraction for me, was the writing style in itself. It’s so deliciously quirky, that I chuckled through a lot of the book. The play on words and satire of the media industry, made for a refreshing change. This doesn’t take itself too seriously and is so much fun to read. If you don’t have a silly sense of humour, don’t read this book. If you want to read something fun, read ‘The Truth’.

I’m looking forward to reading more ‘Discworld’ novels in future.

My Rating ****

 

REVIEW- ‘Sea Glass’ by Ann Shreve

seaglass

What the ‘blurb’ says:

Anita Shreve’s new novel Sea Glass represents a remarkable advance. She previously caught the attention of many readers with Fortune’s Rocks and The Pilot’s Wife, beautifully crafted novels with rich and subtly observed characterisation. But however impressive those books were, Sea Glass has the same adroit creation of character, but the prose is even more rich and allusive. This is a story of the human heart, of the demands of the past, and of the necessity for pragmatism in human relationships. It’s 1929, and Honora Beecher and her husband Sexton are enjoying their new marriage in a cottage on the coast of New Hampshire. Honora is renovating the rundown property and searching for pieces of coloured glass washed up on the beach. Sexton attempts to buy the house they both adore, but with disastrous results: like many other Americans, he is a victim of the stock market crash and is financially wiped out. He is forced to work in a nearby mill, where a labour conflict is having violent results. The couple’s struggle to maintain their marriage in the face of dangerous forces that threaten to overwhelm them is vividly and poignantly told.

Shreve has written nine novels and throughout her work she has painstakingly honed her storytelling skills with elegance and intelligence. She is particularly skilful at depicting interlocking lives, as in Sea Glass, and adroitly invests each with its own portion of love and tragedy. If you want to be one of the “early adopters” of Shreve’s cherishable novels, now is the time:

In the wet sand by her foot, a bit of colour catches her eye. The glass is green pale and cloudy, the colour of lime juice that has been squeezed into a glass. She brushes the sand off and presses the sea glass into her palm, keeping it for luck.

My Thoughts:

Having never read any novels by Anita Shreve, I wasn’t sure what to expect when I embarked on ‘Sea Glass’. What I’ve discovered, is a writer who has an incredible talent for description. The landscapes and details within the novel are so beautiful, it’s like she is painting a picture in your mind, by only using words.

I must admit that it took me a while to really settle down into this novel. Due to the story being told through several different characters, all of which are completely different, I wasn’t sure where this novel was going. With a bit of persistence it became clear.

This novel isn’t exactly a complete story. What I mean by this, is that it is complete (it is a book with a beginning, a middle and an end), but ‘Sea Glass’ focusses on one period of time, in which the characters find themselves dealing with different issues. The characters within this novel are believable, well rounded and vivid. Through them, this book perfectly encapsulates the glamour and struggles people faced, within the 1920’s. The love story also isn’t over sentimental and fits within the book as a whole.

The only criticism I could give about this novel, is its slower pace. Then again, this may be just personal preference. Nevertheless, I think that ‘Sea Glass‘ is a beautiful novel and I look forward to reading more novels by Ann Shreve.

My Rating ****